TexasEscapes.comWe Take Texas Personally
A Texas Travel, History & Architecture Magazine
SITE MAP : : NEW : : RESERVATIONS : : TEXAS TOWNS A-Z : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : ::ARCHITECTURE : : IMAGES
HOME
SEARCH SITE
RESERVATIONS
Hotels
Cars
Air
USA
World
Cruises
TEXAS TRAVEL
TOWNS A to Z
Towns by Region
Ghost Towns
TRIPS :
State Parks
Rivers
Lakes
Drives
Maps
LODGING
TEXAS
FORUM
FEATURES :
Ghosts
People
Historic Trees
Cemeteries
ARCHITECTURE :
Courthouses
Jails
Bridges
Theaters
Churches
Gas Stations
Water Towers
Monuments/Statues
Schoolhouses
Post Offices
Depots
IMAGES :
Old Neon
Murals
Signs
BOOKS
COLUMNS
TE Site
Site Information
Recommend Us
Newsletter
About Us
Contact TE
 
 Texas : Features : Columns : "Good Day for a Story"
"Good Day for a Story"

One If By Land, Two If By Sea
by Jeanne Moseley
When watching Saturday afternoon movies back in the 1950s, it was easy enough to tell the difference between good and evil. Wearing a black hat meant you were a bad guy. Riding a white horse, just the opposite.

And as history was recounted in epic movie events, I could quickly spot the enemy by the color of his coat or by his allegiance to a certain flag. Another barrier that made it easy to distinguish wrong from right was the "Iron Curtain."

Mr. Hancock, my eighth-grade history teacher, seldom had difficulty in explaining world wars and who was on what side. Even as I stood in Mrs. Blythe's study hall and listened as the Bay of Pigs crisis unfolded, I could still identify communism as the enemy with Nikita Khrushchev our major foe.

But today, without clear understanding, I join my country as we struggle to define the enemy. On television, I tearfully watch as, one after another, family members go in search of those missing, and am totally aware if I ever allow myself to fully feel their loss, I myself might never recover.

I find protection in daily routine as do those around me, but I notice that we look longer into each other's eyes and speak on friendlier terms. We seem to extend everyday courtesies to each other, and we appear less like strangers more like family.

We began flying our flags long before asked and once again the red, white and blue symbolizes our unity against whatever foe has brought such disaster to so many. With each flag there flies a sense that we'll find victory and triumph over loss.

I am an American engulfed with feelings shared by good people all over the world, and I cannot erase the sound of sweet voices as they called home one, last time to say goodbye.

It's for their sake that I long for the days when a patriot such as Paul Revere could warn us all that an enemy was fast approaching.


Copyright 2001 Jeanne Moseley
HOME
Privacy Statement | Disclaimer
Website Content Copyright 1998-2004. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved
This page last modified: February 9, 2004