TexasEscapes.com Texas Escapes Online Magazine: Travel and History
Columns: History, Humor, Topical and Opinion
Over 1600 Texas Towns & Ghost Towns
NEW : : TEXAS TOWNS : : GHOST TOWNS : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : : ARCHITECTURE : : IMAGES : : SITE MAP
HOME
SEARCH SITE
ARCHIVES
RESERVATIONS
Texas Hotels
Hotels
Cars
Air
Cruises
 
  Texas : Features : Columns : N. Ray Maxie :

The Left Handed Twist-tie

by N. Ray Maxie
N. Ray Maxie
The convenient little twist-tie. You know, you probably twist on one or two of those things everyday. It is a relative modern-day development used mainly these days to keep our plastic bags securely closed and our merchandise neatly packaged. They are found almost everywhere we shop, especially at the super market. And sometimes those little plastic or paper covered wires are in such demand; they are really hard to find over in the produce department. But that seems to me where the twist-tie is needed most. I regularly surmise they probably aren't a big priority to the produce department workers since many times I cannot find even one. When they aren't readily available, I think most of us will just tie a knot in top of the bag to keep it closed. But then often there isn't enough room to tie a knot and besides, that is more pain and a lot of trouble we hurried shoppers actually don't need. I'd much rather place my produce selection in a plastic bag, spin the top closed and quickly apply the little twist-tie, being done with it. Let's face it, those little fastener are mighty handy. If our bags aren't securely tied, many items will just scatter all over the shopping cart or fall through the cracks.

The bakeries too, are an enormous user of twist-ties. I know you have noticed fewer and fewer bread companies are using that miserable little flat plastic clip, which I hate anyway. When I bring my bread home, I keep reclosing it daily with whatever fastener came on it. Those plastic clips will snag on your bread bag, tearing it, or they will break in half, leaving you having to find a twist-tie later, anyway. Twist-ties are so versatile and reusable. A good loaf of fresh bread will only last such a short time at my house. We seem to always leave it on the counter top, opening and reclosing it with the twist-tie until it is all gone. Right there near the toaster seems so convenient. We have a bowl full of junky little stuff there too; like a few rubber bands, chip clips, little fast food packs of salt, pepper and ketchup, etc., etc., plus many used twist-ties.

Stumbling out of bed, half-awake every morning, I usually head for the kitchen to make a piece of toast and immediately start the coffee maker perking. Have you ever stood there holding the bread loaf and twisting on the twist-tie? I have! You know, you twist and twist; thinking this thing should open soon. But it doesn't! You blink a time or two and take a closer look. The little twist-tie is almost used up and curled completely to the end. Well, you decide that you have been twisting that little sucker the wrong direction. You change directions and after about a dozen turns, it pops open. Now fully awake, you realize that someone around this house doesn't turn twist-ties the same direction you do. Maybe that someone is left-hand dominant.

What is the correct direction to close a twist-tie? Right or left? Or, IS there a correct direction? Are there machines or people at the bakery that close them in either direction or, both directions? Does one bakery turn twist-ties one direction and the other bakery, the other direction? I don't really know these answers. All I know is that it is often frustrating when everyone at our house doesn't open and close them the same way. It seems that left handed people, southpaws, will turn the twist-tie to the left, while right hand dominant people will turn them to the right. In my humble opinion, RIGHT is the right direction. Think about it! Which way do we turn a screw? Which way do we turn nuts and bolts? Which way does the clock turn? Clockwise. To the right of course. Right is right! Case closed.

Also, have you ever noticed that some folks, at home or at work, just won't reclose a lid properly? Not checking the lid on a jug of juice or other liquid before you shake it vigorously, is a no-brainer. So is trying to hold a jar by the lid while lifting it from the refrigerator. That is a whole 'nother story.

But then, if everyone did all things exactly the same as I do, life would indeed be most miserable, dull and boring. Unexciting in every way. We certainly don't want that. Do we?
N. Ray Maxie
piddlinacres@consolidated.net
"Ramblin' Ray"
November 1, 2005
 
TEXAS TOWN LIST | TEXAS GHOST TOWNS | TEXAS COUNTIES
Texas Hill Country | East Texas | Central Texas North | Central Texas South |
West Texas | Texas Panhandle | South Texas | Texas Gulf Coast
TRIPS | STATES PARKS | RIVERS | LAKES | DRIVES | MAPS

TEXAS FEATURES
Ghosts | People | Historic Trees | Cemeteries | Small Town Sagas | WWII |
History | Black History | Rooms with a Past | Music | Animals | Books | MEXICO
COLUMNS : History, Humor, Topical and Opinion

TEXAS ARCHITECTURE | IMAGES
Courthouses | Jails | Churches | Gas Stations | Schoolhouses | Bridges | Theaters |
Monuments/Statues | Depots | Water Towers | Post Offices | Grain Elevators |
Lodges | Museums | Stores | Banks | Gargoyles | Corner Stones | Pitted Dates |
Drive-by Architecture | Old Neon | Murals | Signs | Ghost Signs | Then and Now
Vintage Photos

TRAVEL RESERVATIONS | USA

Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Recommend Us
Contributors | Staff | Contact TE
TEXAS ESCAPES ONLINE MAGAZINE
Website Content Copyright 1998-2007. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved
This page last modified: August 8, 2007