TexasEscapes.comTexas Escapes Online Magazine: Travel and History
Columns: History, Humor, Topical and Opinion
Over 1400 Texas Towns & Ghost Towns
NEW : : TEXAS TOWNS : : GHOST TOWNS : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : : ARCHITECTURE : : IMAGES : : SITE MAP
HOME
SEARCH SITE
ARCHIVES
FORUM
RESERVATIONS
Texas Hotels
Hotels
Cars
Air
Cruises
 
 Texas : Features : Columns : All Things Historical :

Texas Schoolhouses

KINKAID SCHOOL

by Archie P. McDonald
Archie McDonald Ph.D.
When I attended French High School in Beaumont, Texas, early in the 1950s, we "country hicks" from the north side of town looked across town at students in the tonier Beaumont High School, many of whose students lived in the affluent westside along Calder Avenue. It would have been above our station to know that Beaumont Highers felt the same way about the scholars at Kinkaid School in Houston. And when we did learn of it, all would have been convinced that we lacked both the money and brainpower to attend Texas' leading preparatory school.

Mrs. Margaret Kinkaid began her school in 1904 because the public school system would not employ married women as teachers. Since she wanted both a family and a career, she began her own school in her home at the corner of Elgin and San Jacinto streets with seven students. The school closed briefly because of the headmistress' pregnancy with a second son, then reopened in 1906.

Within a short time classes had expanded to most of the rooms in the Kinkaid home, so the house was jacked up and a new first floor of classrooms constructed. More growth led to the formation of a board of trustees composed of some of Houston's wealthiest and most influential citizens, who decided to move Kinkaid School to new facilities at 1301 Richmond Avenue, and to add high school classes to the curriculum in 1929.

In the 1940s Kinkaid's trustees purchased additional property on which to construct an additional building for classrooms and a gymnasium. In 1957 they moved the school to a new forty-acre campus located in the Memorial section, then regarded as a suburb of Houston.

Margaret Kinkaid ran the school until 1951, which she was succeeded by John H. Cooper as headmaster. Mrs. Kinkaid was killed in December 1951 in an automobile accident. Cooper modernized the curriculum by adding performing and visual arts.

By the 1990s Kinkaid offered instruction from pre-kindergarten through high school, and a diploma that recommended its graduates for acceptance at institutions of higher education everywhere.

Most French High hicks, and even the tonier Beaumont Highers, did all right, too, considering our raising.

Book Your Hotel Here & Save
Houston Hotels >
Archie P. McDonald
All Things Historical

April 24, 2006 column
A syndicated column in over 40 East Texas newspapers
This column is provided as a public service by the East Texas Historical Association. Archie P. McDonald is director of the Association and author of more than 20 books on Texas.
 
TEXAS TOWN LIST | TEXAS GHOST TOWNS
Texas Hill Country | East Texas | Central Texas North | Central Texas South |
West Texas | Texas Panhandle | South Texas | Texas Gulf Coast
TRIPS | State Parks | Rivers | Lakes | Drives | Maps | LODGING

TEXAS FEATURES
Ghosts | People | Historic Trees | Cemeteries | Small Town Sagas | WWII |
History | Black History | Rooms with a Past | Music | Animals | Books | MEXICO
COLUMNS : History, Humor, Topical and Opinion

TEXAS ARCHITECTURE | IMAGES
Courthouses | Jails | Churches | Gas Stations | Schoolhouses | Bridges | Theaters | Monuments/Statues | Depots | Water Towers | Post Offices | Grain Elevators |
Lodges | Museums | Stores | Banks | Gargoyles | Corner Stones | Pitted Dates |
Drive-by Architecture | Old Neon | Murals | Signs | Ghost Signs

TRAVEL RESERVATIONS
TEXAS HOTELS | Hotels | Cars | Air | Cruises | USA


Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Recommend Us | Links
Contributors | Staff | About Us | Contact TE |
TEXAS ESCAPES ONLINE MAGAZINE
HOME
Website Content Copyright 1998-2006. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved
This page last modified: April 24, 2006