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 Texas : Architecture / Images :

SHREVEPORT'S
VICTORIAN ERA ARCHITECTURE

Text and Photos by Gerald Massey
Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Shreveport LA
Holy Trinity Catholic Church
Marker Text: "Established in 1856, Holy Trinity was moved to this site in 1858. Five of its priests lost their lives treating the victoms of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1873. The present church, in Romanesque Revival style, was built in 1896."
In my hobby of photography, I lean toward architectural subjects. My hometown of Shreveport, Louisiana, has many architecture themes, not the least of which is Victorian homes. Victorian was a Period, not a Style from about 1840 to 1900 with many styles. The term “Victorian” commonly refers to the period of Queen Victoria of England’s long reign (1837–1901), an era whose architecture was characterized by increasing elaboration and complexity made possible by advances in industry. The era encompassed a number of architectural styles, including the Queen Anne, Richardsonian Romanesque, Italianate, French Second Empire, Stick, Shingle, and Gothic Revival. These are the styles that are most readily associated with “Victorian” in the public consciousness. The most familiar is the Queen Anne style whose cottages are better known as the “Ginger Bread Houses.”

There are about 23 of these beautiful houses remaining in Shreveport. Many of them are designated Louisiana Historic sites. They are located in only three areas of old Shreveport: Austin Place, Fairfield Avenue and within the Highland Historic District.

Included in my sampling are two examples of Victorian eccesiastical architecture. The Holy Trinity Catholic Church and the Antioch Baptist Church are both located near old downtown Shreveport and both are of the handsome Richardsonian Romanesque style. The Marby House is unique that it is now a restaurant. The Logan Mansion is open for tours and has a documented history of being a “haunted house.” It is one not to miss. The story behind the haunting and some of the activities is most interesting. I have taken the tour and most definitely recommend it. It is located on Austin Place, a short street that has several other historic houses and Victorian houses on it.
Antioch Baptist Church, Shreveport LA
Antioch Baptist Church
1057 Texas Avenue
Antioch Baptist Church  marker, Shreveport LA
Antioch Baptist Church marker & neon sign
1057 Texas Avenue
Antioch Baptist Church is the oldest Black church in Shreveport and dates from 1866. It sits on Texas Avenue, which is also US Highway 80. This street in early and pioneer days was known as the “Texas Road” as it was the route that followed the high ground from the Red River west into Texas that transmigrating Southerners took into Texas.
Historic Site Logan Mansion, Shreveport LA
Historic Site Logan Mansion
Marker Text: "Built 1897 by L. R. Logan, beer and ice manufecturer. Designed by architect Nathaniel Sykes Allen. One of finest remaining Queen Anne Victorian houses in city."
Historic Site Mabry House, Shreveport LA
Historic Site Mabry House
Marker Text: "Built 1902 by William A. Mabry of Goldstein & Mabry Grocery Co. Mr. Mabry was later an attorney in private practice, district attorney and district court judge. Although later divided into apartments and then various uses, including a law firm and the present Mabry Houst Restaurant, the house is extremely well preserved with most original interior details still intact.
Historic Site Lewis House, Shreveport LA
Historic Site Lewis House
Marker Text: "Built 1898. One of the few remaining large Victorian houses in Highland. Named for early owner Thomas C. Lewis, a pioneer druggist.
Sewall House, Shreveport LA
Sewall House
Christian-Hamel House,  Shreveport LA
Christian-Hamel House
Victorian architecture Shreveport LA
Victorian architecture Shreveport LA
Victorian architecture Shreveport LA
I have lived in Shreveport all of my life, about 72-years now, and I never noticed or paid attention to these handsome places. But, once I was introduced to them in the pursuit of my hobby, I appreciate them, really appreciate them, not only in my hometown, but all the other places where I have found them. - Gerald Massey, 2009

Copyright Gerald Massey

Related Topic: Texas Victorian Architecture
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