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  Texas : Features : Columns : N. Ray Maxie :

The Ark-La-Tex
and Bogus Springs, Texas

by N. Ray Maxie
N. Ray Maxie
Bogus Springs, Texas is now a ghost town. On FM 125 in southeastern Cass County about three miles west of McLeod and ten miles from Tri-States. Tri-States is known by some as Three Corners, the place where three state lines meet. The larger region known as the Ark-La-Tex includes Three Corners and as the name suggests, portions of Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas. Although, I was born and raised very near Tri-States, I have never gone there and placed my hands and feet in three states at the same time. Many friends and others I know have done the "spread eagle" there, especially area high school kids. Reportedly there are hordes of people that have traveled many miles to do just that.

They say that I was born under a giant walnut tree in a run-down old farmhouse. It was near the banks of Moss's Mill Pond. That old millpond is another story that I will write about later. My actual birthplace was two and half miles north of McLeod just off an old, sandy county road, on my grandfather's farm. The Louisiana state line is just a stone's throw away. My father was a native Texan and my mother was a native Louisianian. Having deep northeast Texas as my native turf, in my youth, I wasn't sure if I was a Texas mockingbird or a Louisiana pelican. My doctor came by horse and buggy out of Rodessa, Louisiana and when he filled out my birth certificate, he put that I was born in Rodessa, Texas. That certificate proves that I am a Native Texan.

Several high school friends, however, had problems. When they went off to big Texas State universities after high school, those schools attempted to charge them out-of-state tuition because they had an out-of-state address, even though they physically lived in Texas on a rural mail route out of a Louisiana post office. Those students were required to get a signed affidavit from the Louisiana postmaster verifying that they actually lived in Texas. Then they could rightfully pay (the considerably cheaper) in-state tuition.
The Ark-La-Tex area is a unique world apart from any others. East Texas lingo is spoken there in the "Lap Lands" where Louisiana laps over into Texas. Cajun has a strong influence there. Some people living in Texas are native Louisianians and some people living over in Louisiana are native Texans. Deer, squirrel and duck hunting are very popular in those piney woods. Night 'coon hunters abound and as for fishing, there's no better fresh water fishing anywhere.

A triangle is formed by the three points of Marshall, Texarkana and Shreveport, Louisiana. Within that triangle lies my "old stomping grounds" of Caddo Lake, Lake of the Pines and Lake (Texarkana) Wright Patman on the Sulphur River. Not very far into Louisiana flows the mighty Red River, famous for irrigating pecans groves and and cotton farms. The whole area is a great place to live and raise a family. Life is simpler, quieter and moves at a slower pace.





Bogus Springs is a vanished Rodessa oilfield community. It was an active little town during the 1920's, '30's and '40's. It must have had 20 to 30 people living there during it's heyday. I can remember that the spring the town is named after was still actively flowing in the 1950's. The community was built around the cold water spring. ...
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N. Ray Maxie "Ramblin' Ray" February 1, 2005
piddlinacres@consolidated.net
 
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