TexasEscapes.com HOME Welcome to Texas Escapes
A magazine written by Texas
Custom Search
New   |   Texas Towns   |   Ghost Towns   |   Counties   |   Trips   |   Features   |   Columns   |   Architecture   |   Images   |   Archives   |   Site Map

Counties
Texas Counties


Texas Towns
A - Z



Columns | Go Far With Kovar

Help! My Teen Spends Spends Spends

by Taylor Kovar

August 6 , 2023

Hi Taylor - My 12-year-old son doesn't seem interested in good spending habits, to the point where he kind of ignores my advice. Any tips for how I can break through to him?

Hi Mindy - This is one of my favorite topics—not because I've got all the answers, but because I enjoy the challenge of it. Every mind works a little differently and everyone has their own Money Personality, so figuring out how to get through to a pre-teen is quite the riddle. There will be a lot of trial and error, but here are some good rules to follow.

1. Don't make it about money. As an adult who worries about bills and rent and groceries, you have a very different relationship to money than a kid with no financial responsibility. What looks like bad spending habits to you might feel completely reasonable to your son, so you won't get anywhere by trying to explain how money should be spent. Instead, the conversation has to be about his interests. What big-ticket items does he want to buy? Where's a place he'd like to go? What's an activity he really wants to do? Get him excited about something in the future, then try to attach that objective to a savings goal. Make saving exciting instead of boring and he might do an about-face.

2. Gamify.
Everything is more fun when you get to play. If you give your son an allowance, start giving him the opportunity to earn extra dollars through playful chores or trivia night, something where it's not too much work but not just free money. The money earned has to be saved for something specific like an outfit for a school dance or a family trip; this way you don't give him the opportunity to blow the experiment on a video game or some other ordinary purchase. Without taking money away from your son, this will give you a chance to have some say in how he spends and make him aware of goal-oriented saving.

3. Take the Money Personality test together. Depending on your son's self-awareness, he might actually enjoy learning why he feels the way he does about money. We've got a free test at 5MoneyPersonalities.com where everyone in your family can learn about their primary and secondary Money Personalities. It will be really helpful for you, the parent, and it might be interesting for your kid. Lots of teenagers get excited about having a personality to identify with, and just getting this self-assessment can change their spending habits a little.

I expect you'll still get a little resistance to whatever money conversations you try to have. As long as you start the discussion on your son's terms, you can hopefully get a foot in the door and build off of that first talk. Good luck, Mindy!
Taylor Kovar

"Go Far With Kovar" August 6, 2023 Column
Legal Disclaimer: Information presented is for educational purposes only and is not an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein. To submit a question to be answered in this column, please send it via email to Question@GoFarWithKovar.com, or via USPS to Taylor Kovar, 415 S 1st St, Suite 300, Lufkin, TX 75901.


Texas Escapes Online Magazine »   Archive Issues » Home »
TEXAS TOWNS & COUNTIES TEXAS LANDMARKS & IMAGES TEXAS HISTORY & CULTURE TEXAS OUTDOORS MORE
Texas Counties
Texas Towns A-Z
Texas Ghost Towns

TEXAS REGIONS:
Central Texas North
Central Texas South
Texas Gulf Coast
Texas Panhandle
Texas Hill Country
East Texas
South Texas
West Texas

Courthouses
Jails
Churches
Schoolhouses
Bridges
Theaters
Depots
Rooms with a Past
Monuments
Statues

Gas Stations
Post Offices
Museums
Water Towers
Grain Elevators
Cotton Gins
Lodges
Stores
Banks

Vintage Photos
Historic Trees
Cemeteries
Old Neon
Ghost Signs
Signs
Murals
Gargoyles
Pitted Dates
Cornerstones
Then & Now

Columns: History/Opinion
Texas History
Small Town Sagas
Black History
WWII
Texas Centennial
Ghosts
People
Animals
Food
Music
Art

Books
Cotton
Texas Railroads

Texas Trips
Texas Drives
Texas State Parks
Texas Rivers
Texas Lakes
Texas Forts
Texas Trails
Texas Maps
USA
MEXICO
HOTELS

Site Map
About Us
Privacy Statement
Disclaimer
Contributors
Staff
Contact Us

 
Website Content Copyright Texas Escapes LLC. All Rights Reserved