TexasEscapes.com HOME Welcome to Texas Escapes
A magazine written by Texas
Custom Search
New   |   Texas Towns   |   Ghost Towns   |   Counties   |   Trips   |   Features   |   Columns   |   Architecture   |   Images   |   Archives   |   Site Map



Counties
Texas Counties


Texas Towns
A - Z


Columns

Columns | Go Far With Kovar

What's Up With Gas Prices?

by Taylor Kovar

August 30, 2022

Hi Taylor - I am very happy to finally be paying less for gas after a rough couple of months. Do you know what exactly changed? It feels like prices ramped up and then came back down without any obvious shift in policy or world events, but maybe I'm missing something. - Melissa

Hi Melissa
- I agree! A trip to the gas station feels a lot better now than it did a few months back. It's also true that the price drop has come without a singular, identifiable catalyst, mostly because a lot of factors play into the cost of fuel. As much as certain people want to place blame and take credit for what you pay at the pump, it's not always that black and white.

1. Supply. First and foremost, oil is a global commodity. In the U.S., we produce a ton of the stuff, but we import even more. There are fifteen different nations in OPEC producing crude oil, and those member countries have more of an impact on global prices than anything any American politician could say or do. If you look at a timeline of 2022, prices ramped up right after the invasion of Ukraine and the subsequent sanctions imposed on Russia. That's because the global supply took a hit, and gas companies had to raise prices in response. Again, not the only factor but a clear marking point for when gas started getting more expensive.

2. Demand. Summer is always a pricier time for gas because travel goes up. That includes air travel, and every flight burns through a ton of fuel. When we couple the facts that the global market was squeezed for supply and global demand was still high, it's no surprise that the average price per gallon went up to $5. What happened next? Travel hit its peak, and then people started hunkering down. At that point, a gallon of gas was expensive enough that people actually altered their behavior to drive less and spend less. Demand dropped, and prices followed suit.

3. What's next? It's great that prices dropped, but there's no guarantee the trend will continue. Hurricane season can really disrupt U.S. production and create another price spike. International conflicts still have a say in what we pay at the pump, and inflation and supply issues affect the refineries' operating costs which in turn affect your wallet. The good news is that the dollar is strong right now, and a strong dollar always bodes well in the global commodities market.

The price jump from earlier this summer was definitely a confluence of issues, and any price reduction is because of multiple factors as well. Whatever those factors may be, let's hope the cost of gas keeps moving in the right direction. Thanks for the question, Melissa!
Taylor Kovar August 30, 2022
More "Go Far With Kovar"



Legal Disclaimer: Information presented is for educational purposes only and is not an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein. To submit a question to be answered in this column, please send it via email to Question@GoFarWithKovar.com, or via USPS to Taylor Kovar, 415 S 1st St, Suite 300, Lufkin, TX 75901.


Texas Escapes Online Magazine »   Archive Issues » Home »
TEXAS TOWNS & COUNTIES TEXAS LANDMARKS & IMAGES TEXAS HISTORY & CULTURE TEXAS OUTDOORS MORE
Texas Counties
Texas Towns A-Z
Texas Ghost Towns

TEXAS REGIONS:
Central Texas North
Central Texas South
Texas Gulf Coast
Texas Panhandle
Texas Hill Country
East Texas
South Texas
West Texas

Courthouses
Jails
Churches
Schoolhouses
Bridges
Theaters
Depots
Rooms with a Past
Monuments
Statues

Gas Stations
Post Offices
Museums
Water Towers
Grain Elevators
Cotton Gins
Lodges
Stores
Banks

Vintage Photos
Historic Trees
Cemeteries
Old Neon
Ghost Signs
Signs
Murals
Gargoyles
Pitted Dates
Cornerstones
Then & Now

Columns: History/Opinion
Texas History
Small Town Sagas
Black History
WWII
Texas Centennial
Ghosts
People
Animals
Food
Music
Art

Books
Cotton
Texas Railroads

Texas Trips
Texas Drives
Texas State Parks
Texas Rivers
Texas Lakes
Texas Forts
Texas Trails
Texas Maps
USA
MEXICO
HOTELS

Site Map
About Us
Privacy Statement
Disclaimer
Contributors
Staff
Contact Us

 
Website Content Copyright Texas Escapes LLC. All Rights Reserved