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Parker County TX
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CARTER, TEXAS
aka Cartersville

Texas Ghost Town
Parker County, Central Texas North

10 miles N of Weatherford the county seat
Population: 0

Carter Area Hotels › Weatherford Hotels

Carter, aka Carterville, Texas
"These are the only two remaining structures."
- Mike Cooley, Fort Worth, TX, June 18, 2005

History in a Pecan Shell

Carter was established just after the end of the Civil War in 1866 – 1867. The name comes from Judge W. F. Carter – one of three town founders. The three men established the town around a business operation – a flour mill on Clear Fork Creek. The town was granted a post office in 1888 that remained open until 1907. The population dwindled in the 1920s due to its proximity to Weatherford.
Cartersville Texas historical marker
Cartersville historical marker
Photo courtesy Sam Maddox, March 2006
Historical marker:

CARTERSVILLE

Founded in 1866 by Judge W. F. Carter, Henry C. Vardy, and Thomas Parkinson, Cartersville was a thriving community for many years. At its height, the town boasted two main thoroughfares, Main Street and College Avenue. Local businesses included stores, a blacksmith shop, corn mill, flour mill, and cotton gin. A post office opened in 1867, and the town also included homes, a school, and two churches. The name of the town was changed to Carter in 1888. By the early 1900s the town began to decline, and little now remains of the community.
(1988)
Carter, TX - Cartersville Texas Memorial
Cartersville Texas Memorial
Photo courtesy Sam Maddox, March 2006
1894 Carter Main Street marker, Carter, Texas
1894 Main Street marker
Photo courtesy Sam Maddox, March 2006
Carter, Texas - Stones Flour Mill Site
The site of H.C. Vardy Flour Mill
Photo courtesy Sam Maddox, March 2006
Carter, Texas - Site of H. C. Vardy  Flour Mill  stone marker
Stone marks the site of H.C. Vardy Flour Mill, burned Nov 14, 1891
Photo courtesy Sam Maddox, March 2006
Carter, Texas - Post Office stone marker
Carter, Texas Post Office marker
Photo courtesy Dustin Martin, September 2016
See Texas Post Offices
Carter, Texas - Seven Rugged Riders stone marker
Seven Rugged Riders marker
Photo courtesy Dustin Martin, September 2016

"SEVEN RUGGED RIDERS:
WILL CURRY, JOHN DOBBS, GEO. LINDSEY, PETE DOBBS, TOM BEENE, IRA DOBBS, BRYANT PRATHER"

(Note: Dobbs and Prather are street names in Carter. - Dustin Martin)

Carter, Texas - Gun fightstone marker
Marker commemorating a gun fight
Photo courtesy Dustin Martin, September 2016

"A gun fight at this location ended a cattlemen's feud in 1873 — The man of the house was left dead in the yard while the other man, badly wounded, rode away unassiste."

More Texas Small Town Sagas

Photo courtesy Dustin Martin, September 2016

"W.H. McLAUGHLIN SAW INDIANS PASS AND LATER LEARNED THEY HAD STOLE THE DAVIS BOY AND GIRL"

Photo courtesy Dustin Martin, September 2016

"JOE HEMPHILL OF THE CARTER COMMUNITY WAS THE LAST PERSON KILLED IN PARKER COUNTY BY THE INDIANS JULY 1874"

Parker County Texas 1907 map
Parker County 1907 Postal Map showing Carter, Springtown along a creek (near Wise County line)
Courtesy Texas General Land Office
Carter, Texas’ inclusion was suggested by Paul McCarty who wrote the following e-mail:

“When I was a child, I remember a ghost town in Parker County about halfway between Springtown and Weatherford, Texas on Highway 51. I am unsure of the name of the county road you turn on to get to it, but the turn off is at an intersection with a very old schoolhouse on the corner. I'm not sure of its name and don't know if it is still in use or not. The road and ghost town are to the North about 3-4 miles from this schoolhouse. They are near an old church and cemetery.

All that really remains is a collection of stone markers and monuments on the side of the road in several locations. Some you really have to look for to find. They mark different locations and events that happened in this town, which was apparently fairly wild. Several mark the locations of documented gunfights or Indian raids.

I believe the church may be the old town church. Come to think of it, I think the road is named Carter Road. At any rate, I have not been there in many years, but last time I was there, the monuments were still in existence. It makes a good trip for western history buffs and is not very well known except to the locals.”

Carter, Texas Forum

  • "Carter may be a ghost - but it isn't dead."
    Carter, TX began its history with the creation of its first mill. The town quickly sprang up around it, which at one time consisted of a general store, saloon, church, and school There were frequent Indian attacks, perhaps due to its close proximity to some Indian burial grounds which still exist today. Many people lost their lives here in the attacks, not to mention tornadoes, gunfights, and a fire. While today Carter sits vacant and is more accurately described as a ghost town, it is anything but dead. As a paranormal group based in Tarrant County, Tarrant County Investigators of the Paranormal has developed a special fondness for Carter. Our ongoing investigations here have produced results from catching orbs and EVP's (Electronic Voice Phenomenon) to significant EMF (Electro-magnetic Field) readings and even being touched. To date, we have captured at least five distinctly different voices here and we are sure more are to come. If you would like to hear some of our EVP's or just simply read more about the Carter, Texas investigations, please visit our site www.tarrantcountyparanormal.com - Tarrant County Investigators of the Paranormal, June 13, 2006

  • Subject: Carter, TX
    After seeing Carter on your website, I decided to fire up the Harley and ride out there. These are the only two remaining structures. The one on the left is now a chicken coop and home to the biggest chicken I've ever seen! - Mike Cooley, Fort Worth, TX, June 18, 2005

  • Subject: Carter ghost town
    I live one mile away from the Carter tabernacle. The reason that Carter became a ghost town was because a tornado came through and destroyed all the buildings in town. Carter is the name of the road and the closest to it is Prather which was a man from back then. The tabernacle has a church right next to it. The old post office is now a house. The Red Dog Saloon is still there and the front yard is a motor cross place. The land out here is still beautiful in the summer. - Casey Wharton, November 22, 2004

  • Take a road trip
    Carter, Texas Nearby Towns:
    Weatherford the county seat
    See Parker County | Central Texas North

    Book Hotel Here:
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