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MUNDAY, TEXAS

Knox County, Texas Panhandle / Central Texas North

3326'57"N 9937'34"W (33.449292, -99.626028)
Highways 277, and 222 and FMs 1587 and 2811
SE of Benjamin the county seat
12 Miles E of Knox City
20 Miles N of Haskell
78 Miles N of Abilene
23 Miles SW of Seymour
73 Miles SW of Wichita Falls
74 Miles SE of Quanah
Population: 1,324 Est. (2016)
1,300 (2010) 1,527 (2000) 1,600 (1990)

Munday Area Hotels
Abilene Hotels | Wichita Falls Hotels
Munday Tx Building
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2009
See Texas Architecture

Munday History in a Pecan Shell

Originally called Maud after a popular citizen, the town evolved from the humble building of its first store in 1893. The following year storekeeper R.P. Munday applied for a post office and submitted his name on the application - which was granted. Maud became Munday by post decree.

Even in its infantcy, Munday was split into East and West sections. In 1903 the storekeepers and businesses in West Munday moved to East Munday, forming a single and united town. Three years later the railroad began service and made Munday Knox County's dominant town, although it doesn't seem to have tried to become the county seat.

Earlier statistics are not available, but the 1940 population shows over 1,500 citizens in Munday, growing to a peak of 2,270 just ten years later. Cotton processing was always a major economic factor, but irrigation permitted farmers to diversify into vegetable crops. In 1971 Texas A&M University opened research facility here. The population dropped to 1,978 in 1960, 1,762 ten years later and 1,600 in 1990.


Munday, Texas Today

Photographer's Note:
"There is something new to see every time it is visited." - Barclay Gibson.
Munday Tx Hwy 222 Exit Sign
Texas 222 Munday exit sign
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2009
US flag - Munday Tx Highway Overpass
U.S. flag on highway overpass
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2009
Munday Tx Coca-Cola 5 Cent s Sign
"Drink Coca-Cola in Bottles 5"
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2009
Munday Tx Drink Coca-Cola
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2009.
See Coca-Cola
Munday Tx - Roy Theatre
Roy Theatre
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2009
Munday Tx - Roy Theatre box office
Box office.
More Texas Theatres

Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2009
Munday Texas water tower and grain elevators
Grain elevator and water tower
TE photo, March 2003
See Texas Grain Elevators | Texas Water Towers

Take a road trip

Munday, Texas Nearby Towns:
Benjamin the county seat
Knox City
Haskell
Abilene
Seymour
Wichita Falls
Quanah
See , Texas Panhandle / Central Texas North

Book Hotel Here:
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