TexasEscapes.com HOME Welcome to Texas Escapes
A magazine written by Texas
 
New   |   Texas Towns   |   Ghost Towns   |   Counties   |   Trips   |   Features   |   Columns   |   Architecture   |   Images   |   Archives   |   Site Map

Texas | Columns | All Things Historical

JAMES STEPHEN HOGG

by Archie P. McDonald, PhD
Archie McDonald, PhD
Historian Joe Frantz observed that all Texas governors are judged by the standard set by James Stephen Hogg. Frantz said he knew this was true because the introduction of nearly every governor in the twentieth century said that the incumbent was "the best since Jim Hogg."

Jim Hogg certainly was one of the best, and he claimed another distinction: the first governor born in the state. Hogg was born in Rusk, Texas, in 1851. He was tutored privately before attending a formal school in Alabama.
Jim Hogg

Jim Hogg
Photo wikipedia

Hogg returned to Texas and worked as a typesetter for the newspaper in Rusk before editing newspapers in Tyler, Longview, and Quitman. While working in Quitman, Hogg married Sarah (Sallie) Stinson. He served as county attorney for Wood County and then district attorney for the Seventh District.

Hogg was elected attorney general of Texas in 1886, the year Lawrence Sullivan (Sul) Ross was elected governor. Ross supported Hogg's crusades against the insurance and railroad industries, which resulted in savings for policy holders and better transportation services.

Hogg lost some, too. In the "Grass Lease Cases" he was unable to force renegotiation of "sweetheart" deals that allowed West Texas cattle raisers use of public lands for grazing without paying market value, and he lost the "Drummer Tax" case, or a tax on traveling salesmen. On the whole, though, he won the votes of a majority of Texans because they knew he was fighting for their interests. Hogg won reelection in 1888 and then was elected governor in 1890 and 1892.

Governor Hogg introduced the Progressive Era to Texas. He persuaded the legislature to create the Railroad Commission, the first state regulatory agency in America, and institute a number of reforms in stock and bond transactions.

After retiring from the governor's office in 1895, Hogg, who had not made much money while in public service, became a millionaire through the practice of law and lucrative investments associated with the new oil industry. His daughter, Ima Hogg, used that fortune in many philanthropic ways until her own death in 1975.

And no, there were no children named Ura Hogg or Hesa Hogg.


All Things Historical August 27, 2000
Published by permission.
(Archie McDonald is author of Pioneers, Poke Sallet and Politics with Bob Bowman. It is available through the East Texas Historical Association, Nacogdoches)

Jim Hogg Related Stories:

  • Campaign Friends & Enemies by Mike Cox
  • Hogg's Prank by Mike Cox
  • Fishing Hogg by Mike Cox
  • Governor Hogg Shrine Historic Site

    See also
  • Jime Hogg County Seat
  • Jim Hogg County Courthouse
  • Jim Hogg County Jail

  • More Columns

    Related Topics:
    Texas History | Texas Towns | People
    Texas Escapes, in its purpose to preserve historic, endangered and vanishing Texas, asks that anyone wishing to share their local history and vintage/historic photos, please contact us.
    Books by Archie P. McDonald - Order Here
    Jim Hogg Related Stories:

  • Campaign Friends & Enemies by Mike Cox
  • Hogg's Prank by Mike Cox
  • Fishing Hogg by Mike Cox
  • Governor Hogg Shrine Historic Site

    See also
  • Jime Hogg County Seat
  • Jim Hogg County Courthouse
  • Jim Hogg County Jail
  •  



    Texas Escapes Online Magazine »   Archive Issues » Go to Home Page »
    TEXAS TOWNS & COUNTIES TEXAS LANDMARKS & IMAGES TEXAS HISTORY & CULTURE TEXAS OUTDOORS MORE
    Texas Counties
    Texas Towns A-Z
    Texas Ghost Towns

    TEXAS REGIONS:
    Central Texas North
    Central Texas South
    Texas Gulf Coast
    Texas Panhandle
    Texas Hill Country
    East Texas
    South Texas
    West Texas

    Courthouses
    Jails
    Churches
    Schoolhouses
    Bridges
    Theaters
    Depots
    Rooms with a Past
    Monuments
    Statues

    Gas Stations
    Post Offices
    Museums
    Water Towers
    Grain Elevators
    Cotton Gins
    Lodges
    Stores
    Banks

    Vintage Photos
    Historic Trees
    Cemeteries
    Old Neon
    Ghost Signs
    Signs
    Murals
    Gargoyles
    Pitted Dates
    Cornerstones
    Then & Now

    Columns: History/Opinion
    Texas History
    Small Town Sagas
    Black History
    WWII
    Texas Centennial
    Ghosts
    People
    Animals
    Food
    Music
    Art

    Books
    Cotton
    Texas Railroads

    Texas Trips
    Texas Drives
    Texas State Parks
    Texas Rivers
    Texas Lakes
    Texas Forts
    Texas Trails
    Texas Maps
    USA
    MEXICO
    HOTELS

    Site Map
    About Us
    Privacy Statement
    Disclaimer
    Contributors
    Staff
    Contact Us

     
    Website Content Copyright Texas Escapes LLC. All Rights Reserved