TexasEscapes.com 
HOME : : NEW : : TEXAS TOWNS : : GHOST TOWNS : : TEXAS HOTELS : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : : BUILDINGS : : IMAGES : : ARCHIVE : : SITE MAP
PEOPLE : : PLACES : : THINGS : : HOTELS : : VACATION PACKAGES
Texas Escapes
Online Magazine
Texas Towns by Region
  • Texas Hill Country
  • Central Texas North
  • Central Texas South
  • South Texas
  • East Texas
  • West Texas
  • Texas Panhandle
  • Texas Gulf Coast
    Texas Towns A - Z
    Over 2700 Towns

    Texas Ghost Towns
    Over 700 Ghost Towns

    Book Hotels
  • Houston Hotels
    Find Hotel Deals in Houston, Texas
    Book Here

    BRUNNER, TEXAS

    An “Absorbed” Ghost Town

    Texas Ghost Town
    Harris County, Texas Gulf Coast
    About 3 Miles W of Downtown Houston
    Between Memorial Park and the Heights
    Population: Included in Houston

    Book Hotels > Houston Hotels

    History on a Pinhead

    Founded along the tracks of the Houston and Texas Central Railroad in the late 1880s, the community once had its own post office but mail service was re-routed through Houston and the post office closed in 1905. (See 1907 Harris County postal map) The town peaked as a separate community with a population of 500 but by 1915 it was considered part of Houston.

    Brunner, TX

    by Bruce Martin
    Not all “Ghost Towns” are evacuated and evolve into decay. Some are absorbed by the growth of adjacent cities.

    Brunner is an area within Houston that was at one time a distinct community. It was located in west central Harris County, along the Houston and Texas Central Railway and 3 miles west of Houston. In 1895, Brunner’s population was 500 and it had a Baptist college, a public school, a German school, two churches, and a saloon. By 1888, a post office existed. The community had 200 residents in 1894. In 1905, the post office closed and the post office in Houston handled the community’s mail service. During that year, the community had 402 people. By 1915, the City of Houston took over what was Brunner and it was no longer considered a community distinct from Houston. [Kleiner, Diana J., “Handbook of Texas”]

    Camp Logan in Houston
    Camp Logan in Houston
    TE postcard
    Located in Houston’s Sixth Ward, the area is directly east of the former Camp Logan, a World War I Army Training Camp. In August, 1917, there was a riot among black soldiers and the local police. (Details of the event can be retrieved from the “Camp Logan Riot” internet site.) Following the altercation, my uncle recovered a bayonet within blocks of his residence. The Camp Logan grounds are now within Houston’s Memorial Park. One stretch of road, leading to the golf course, remains in original condition. Some chunks of concrete building foundations and extensive trenches used in training exercises still remain in the heavily-forested park.

    It is unclear whether an overlay of the Brunner area limits with current maps would indicate its relationship with the now Houston Heights, a region located four miles northwest of downtown Houston. As reported in National Geographic on Foot, “stroll the area’s broad tree-canopied esplanades and side streets dotted with homes dating from the early 1900’s and you may think you have landed in a small town. Residents wave cheerful greetings as they walk dogs or tend to gardens exploding with palms, crepe myrtle trees, and trumpet vines”.

    Adjacent to the south lies the area referred to as “West End”, a neighborhood located along the Washington Avenue Corridor. Traditionally a working class neighborhood, recent development has increased the population density. The official boundaries of West End are Durham Drive to the west, Washington Avenue to the south, I-10 to the north, and Yale Street to the east. Both my paternal and maternal grandparents lived in West End during the 1930’s.

    Raymond Knipple had a shop filled with machines dating from World War I. All of the equipment ran from ONE electric motor connected to the various machines by shafts, pulleys, and leather belts descending from the ceiling. To sharpen a chisel, all machines ran! In the late 1950’s, he built a stagecoach, a surrey with the fringe on top, and a “cut-under” for the film industry, used in movies. The hardware and disassembled pieces came from two sources: the Amish in Pennsylvania and from Austria. The wagon wheels were handcrafted by Raymond. [Contributed by: Thomas G. Mazzu, Houston]

    West End is a part of Super Neighborhood 22, an organized collection of neighborhood civic groups that voices their neighborhood’s interests to various local issues and situations. North of Houston Heights is an area referred to as “Shady Acres”.

    © Bruce Martin

    May 9, 2012

    Harris County 1907 Postal Map showing tracks of the HTC Railroad, but absence of Brunner
    Courtesy Texas General Land Office

    Texas Escapes, in its purpose to preserve historic, endangered and vanishing Texas, asks that anyone wishing to share their local history, stories, and vintage/historic photos, please contact us.

    More Texas | Texas Towns | Texas Ghost Towns | Texas Hotels

    Custom Search
    Book Hotel Here - Expedia Affiliate Network

    CITY SEARCH


    Houston Hotels
    Great Room Rates
    Find One Near Your Destination
    TEXAS ESCAPES CONTENTS
    HOME | TEXAS ESCAPES ONLINE MAGAZINE | HOTELS | SEARCH SITE
    TEXAS TOWN LIST | TEXAS GHOST TOWNS | TEXAS COUNTIES

    Texas Hill Country | East Texas | Central Texas North | Central Texas South | West Texas | Texas Panhandle | South Texas | Texas Gulf Coast
    TRIPS | STATES PARKS | RIVERS | LAKES | DRIVES | FORTS | MAPS

    Texas Attractions
    TEXAS FEATURES
    People | Ghosts | Historic Trees | Cemeteries | Small Town Sagas | WWII | History | Texas Centennial | Black History | Art | Music | Animals | Books | Food
    COLUMNS : History, Humor, Topical and Opinion

    TEXAS ARCHITECTURE | IMAGES
    Courthouses | Jails | Churches | Gas Stations | Schoolhouses | Bridges | Theaters | Monuments/Statues | Depots | Water Towers | Post Offices | Grain Elevators | Lodges | Museums | Rooms with a Past | Gargoyles | Cornerstones | Pitted Dates | Stores | Banks | Drive-by Architecture | Signs | Ghost Signs | Old Neon | Murals | Then & Now
    Vintage Photos

    TRAVEL RESERVATIONS | USA | MEXICO

    Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Contributors | Staff | Contact TE
    Website Content Copyright ©1998-2011. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved