TexasEscapes.comTexas Escapes Online Magazine: Travel and History
Columns: History, Humor, Topical and Opinion
Over 1800 Texas Towns & Ghost Towns
NEW : : TEXAS TOWNS : : GHOST TOWNS : : TEXAS HOTELS : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : : ARCHITECTURE : : IMAGES : : SITE MAP : : SEARCH SITE
HOME
SEARCH SITE
ARCHIVES
RESERVATIONS
Texas Hotels
Hotels
Cars
Air
Cruises
 
 Texas : Towns A-Z / Ghost Towns / Panhandle :

KING'S MILL, TEXAS

Texas Ghost Town
Gray County, Texas Panhandle
Highway 60
1.5 miles W of FM 2300
6 Miles SW of Pampa

Population: Unknown

Area Hotels - Book Here & Save
Pampa Hotels

History in a Pecan Shell

The town is named after Englishman Andrew Kingsmill, a representative of British investors who held the bonds for the White Deer Lands Trust. This company had assumed control of the failed Francklyn Land and Cattle Company in the mid 1880s. Kingsmill was sent to check on things for the company in 1902 and look into perhaps selling off the land. While there, Kingmill did a little investing for his employer - a former British Prime Minister named Rosebery. A water well was drilled on the land and naturally water brought settlers. In 1907 a depot at the new community was built by the Southern Kansas Railway of Texas.

A post office was opened under the name Elca in 1916 but the founder was recognised with a name change to King's Mill in the 1920s. The oil discovery that brought a boom to Pampa
also benefited King's Mill - and by the early 1930s there was a population of 400 people served by 16 businesses.

But after WWII King's Millers left for greener pastures and Pampa
drew off much of the population. The town decreased to just 150 people by 1947. The post office closed sometime before 1966 and from the late 60s through 1990 only 65 people were on the census.

King's Mill was suggested for inclusion by Sharon Thomas of Pampa
who wrote: "Have you considered putting Kingsmill, Texas on the Ghost town list? It is just a few miles west of Pampa located near the Celanese chemical plant. There was some type of contamination and they bought everyone out and tore down every structure in the town. All that is left is a grain elevator with a feed store. As a child in the eighties, I remember passing through there, as I still do today, and saw all the houses along the highway. They are all gone now, but you can still see evidence of where the houses, barns, etc., used to be."

King's Mill Area Hotels - Book Here & Save
Pampa Hotels
More Hotels

 
HOME | TEXAS ESCAPES ONLINE MAGAZINE | TEXAS HOTELS
TEXAS TOWN LIST | TEXAS GHOST TOWNS | TEXAS COUNTIES

Texas Hill Country | East Texas | Central Texas North | Central Texas South | West Texas | Texas Panhandle | South Texas | Texas Gulf Coast
TRIPS | STATES PARKS | RIVERS | LAKES | DRIVES | MAPS

TEXAS FEATURES
Ghosts | People | Historic Trees | Cemeteries | Small Town Sagas | WWII | History | Black History | Rooms with a Past | Music | Animals | Books
COLUMNS : History, Humor, Topical and Opinion

TEXAS ARCHITECTURE | IMAGES
Courthouses | Jails | Churches | Gas Stations | Schoolhouses | Bridges | Theaters | Monuments/Statues | Depots | Water Towers | Post Offices | Grain Elevators | Lodges | Museums | Stores | Banks | Gargoyles | Cornerstones | Pitted Dates | Drive-by Architecture | Old Neon | Murals | Signs | Ghost Signs | Then and Now
Vintage Photos

TRAVEL RESERVATIONS | HOTELS | USA | MEXICO

Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Recommend Us | Contributors | Staff | Contact TE
Website Content Copyright 1998-2008. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved
This page last modified: October 25, 2008