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Culberson County TX
Culberson County

Van Horn Hotels

Fort Stockton Hotels


Texas Ghost Town
Culberson County, West Texas

31° 4' 9" N, 104° 13' 2" W (31.069167, -104.217222)
Highway 80, 118 and FM 2424
36 miles East of Van Horn
152 miles East of El Paso
81 miles West of Fort Stockton
Population: 60 est. (2000)

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Kent TX -  Three generations
"Three generations... served in our armed forces."
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012

History in a Pecan Shell

The town, once called Antelope, was founded in the early 1890s.

A post office was granted in 1893 and by 1914 the population was a thriving 25 persons. The population doubled in the mid-1920s and remained at that level for 40 years. The post office was reported closed in 1960 but has since reopened.

Kent had a population of sixty-five in the late 1960s - falling to 60 by the mid-1970s where it remains today.

Today little is left to interest a tourist - but the juncture of the two roads provides a sense of place. The lone telephone at least looks comforting but its condition is unknown. The overpass of I-10 offers some relief from the scorching sun but it will be sometime before Kent becomes a destination.

More History & Forum
Kent TX - Chevron Station Closed

The closed Chevron Station
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012

Kent Mercantile, Kent Texas
Still open in 2007 - ("Love that spot along I-10, my understanding the store was owned by the Reynolds Cattle Company" - Leticia Diaz, October 21, 2013)
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, June 2007
More Texas Stores | Texas Gas Stations
Kent Texas public school ruins
Kent School ruin
Photo courtesy Brian Brown, January 2006
Kent public school marquee, Kent Texas
Kent public school marquee
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, June 2007
Back of Kent School , Texas
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, June 2007
Kent School on I-10, Kent Texas
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, November 2002
Kent School Texas
Kent School in 1991
Photo courtesy Jesse L. Moore
More Texas Schoolhouses
Kent  Texas post office
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, June 2007
Kent  Texas post office
Kent Post Office
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, June 2007
More Texas Post Offices
Kent TX - Post Office
The Post Office
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012
Photographer's Note:

Ghost town - Kent,
Culberson County
Images of Kent on the north side of I-10 past the post office.
The Chevron station is long closed and there was no sign of anyone living there. Especially poignant is Photo 1; three generations from the red-roofed house that served in our armed forces. - Paul Wilhelm
Kent TX - The road
The road
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012
Kent TX - The house with read fence & roof
"The little red house"
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012
Kent TX -  Red house with outhouse
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012
Kent TX
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012
Kent TX - Old farm house
Photo courtesy Paul Wilhelm, May 2012

Kent, Texas Forum

  • Subject: Nora Boyd, JP
    I worked as a Highway Patrol Trooper stationed in Van Horn and then Pecos in the early 70’s. Mrs. Nora Boyd was the Justice of the Peace in Kent. Back before we had the State Violator Compact, all out of state traffic violators had to be taken before a Justice of the Peace, immediately. No matter what time of day (or night) we would call Judge Boyd on our county radio and say we were 10-95 to her location with a violator. When we got there, she was dressed and sitting behind her desk waiting to dole out justice. She had one gentleman ask if she always took the trooper’s side? She said, “Yes, because my boys don’t lie to me.” And she was 100% correct. Then we had to drink day old coffee with her before we went back to work. She was a jewel. - Glenn Wood, Texas Highway Patrol, Retired, February 15, 2015

  • Subject: The Boyds of Kent
    My father and his 12 brothers and sisters were raised in Kent, Texas. My father's name is Claude C. Boyd. He was born in Kent and lived there many years. When my father returned from the service during WWII, he became the teacher of the school that is pictured on the Kent page. He taught all subjects and all grades together. Among the students were several of his own brothers and sisters including Howard, Richard, Joy, Jolly and Jerry Boyd. My father taught there until the Kent and Van Horn school districts were consolidated. He worked with the Van Horn Chamber of Commerce to make this merger happen. He then drove the bus to get the students to school in Van Horn and was asked to teach there as well. Each year The Boyd Family Reunion takes place the last full weekend of June. Kent increases its population from its traditional 60 to about 120+. during this time. The Boyd brothers and sisters and their children converge on this little dot on the map every year to reminisce and spend time together. We camp or we sleep in the little red house down the road which by the way, my father helped to build. Some of us stay in Van Horn but we all meet in Kent. That place for us is a major attraction and a place where we find our roots. We listen and tell stories about the past and talk about our futures. Time always seems to stand still here in Kent yet time marches on for everyone else. - Anese Boyd Forsyth, (Daughter to Claude and Frances Boyd), June 14, 2007

  • Subject: Kent, Texas School
    A couple of months ago I was returning from a trip I took in my Volkswagen Bus and stopped for gas and stumbled upon the ruins of the Kent Public School building and being one who loves old architecture I took a couple of pictures, some didn't come out but I do have a couple that you might be able to use. - Brian Brown, March 09, 2006

  • My family lived on the Ikins Ranch in the 1950's. We were so far from school that we had to drive four miles to the BarC, (Dorn Ranch) to car pool with some of the children there.

    We went to school in Kent. There were two classrooms and an auditorium. We had an enjoyable time. It was great to get to see the other children. Although I didn't attend school there very long, I was always fascinated with the building. At that time the service station, general store, train depot, and a cafe (not open) were in operation. We had to come into Kent to use the phone at the service station. Also, there were pens where cattle could be shipped. I believe the Long X cattle company was the main founder of the town. We also had dances, and sometimes church services in the old school auditorium. - Kathleen Carr, February 05, 2005

  • I lived in Kent for eight years. My mother worked at the post office and my father worked at the service station. I went to the school that you picture . After it closed we had to be bused to Van Horn. It was a great place to live as a youngster. I have a lot of memories from Kent. - Jack Horton, July 04, 2004

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    Kent, Texas Nearby Towns:
    Van Horn | Fort Stockton
    See Culberson County | West Texas

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