TexasEscapes.com Texas Escapes Online Magazine: Travel and History
Columns: History, Humor, Topical and Opinion
Over 1600 Texas Towns & Ghost Towns
NEW : : TEXAS TOWNS : : GHOST TOWNS : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : : ARCHITECTURE : : IMAGES : : SITE MAP
HOME
SEARCH SITE
ARCHIVES
RESERVATIONS
Texas Hotels
Hotels
Cars
Air
Cruises
 
  Texas : Towns A-Z / Ghost Towns / Panhandle :

Texas Ghost Town
RAMSDELL, TEXAS

Site of first area telephone system with 16 members

by Delbert Trew


Wheeler County, Texas Panhandle
Located in SW corner of County I-40, Exit 148
Turn South on Dirt Road, Go to Sand Creek Crossing
History in a Pecan Shell

The Rev. Ed R. Wallace, a circuit-riding, Methodist preacher started acquiring State lands with land script while riding his church route. After accumulating twelve sections of land he plotted the town of Ramsdell along Sand Creek by the Rock Island Railroad cattle loading facilities. Surrounded by large ranches, the site was used mostly by the RO Ranch and the Rocking Chair Ranch. Later, a large depot and several railroad warehouses were built to protect railroad supplies.

Products shipped from Ramsdell were car-loads of construction sand from Sand Creek for concrete, watermelons, garden produce, eggs and cream and of course, thousands of head of livestock. The first area community telephone system was established at Ramsdell with 16 members. A large school was built along with some forty to sixty buildings during the heyday of the town. Two hotels and lumber yards were among the main businesses serving the public.

No saloons were allowed by Reverend Wallace but weekly dances were allowed to be held in the depot and on the loading docks. Often on dance nights, the Law had to break up fights between the cowboys and settlers for trains to pass down the track.

Although a cemetery was never established, a fence post marks the graves of a traveling family who contracted typhoid fever and died. Another true story states, "My father ordered a barrel of whiskey and it arrived on a wooden railroad car. Prohibition was declared before it could be removed and the Sheriff padlocked the car. Later, when the car was unlocked to remove the barrel they found it empty. The bottom of the boxcar and the bottom of the barrel had been drilled through with a brace and bit and the whiskey drained into a container below. No one ever admitted to the theft, but everyone knew it was my father and uncles."

Gyp water, a bitter concoction at best, plagued the town of Ramsdell from the start. The consolidation of county schools, Route 66 passing several miles to the north and the breakup of the big ranches sealed the final demise.

Today the site of Ramsdell is obscured by plum thickets and brush. The railroad is gone and only a few foundations can be found, all on private property.

İ Delbert Trew

Ramsdell, Texas Forum

Anyone wishing to share history, stories, memories or photos of Ramsdell, Texas, please contact us

Area Hotels, Book Here & Save
Amarillo Hotels
More Hotels
 
TEXAS TOWN LIST | TEXAS GHOST TOWNS | TEXAS COUNTIES
Texas Hill Country | East Texas | Central Texas North | Central Texas South |
West Texas | Texas Panhandle | South Texas | Texas Gulf Coast
TRIPS | STATES PARKS | RIVERS | LAKES | DRIVES | MAPS

TEXAS FEATURES
Ghosts | People | Historic Trees | Cemeteries | Small Town Sagas | WWII |
History | Black History | Rooms with a Past | Music | Animals | Books | MEXICO
COLUMNS : History, Humor, Topical and Opinion

TEXAS ARCHITECTURE | IMAGES
Courthouses | Jails | Churches | Gas Stations | Schoolhouses | Bridges | Theaters |
Monuments/Statues | Depots | Water Towers | Post Offices | Grain Elevators |
Lodges | Museums | Stores | Banks | Gargoyles | Corner Stones | Pitted Dates |
Drive-by Architecture | Old Neon | Murals | Signs | Ghost Signs | Then and Now
Vintage Photos

TRAVEL RESERVATIONS | USA

Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Recommend Us
Contributors | Staff | Contact TE
TEXAS ESCAPES ONLINE MAGAZINE
Website Content Copyright İ1998-2007. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved
This page last modified: October 16, 2006