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ROUTE 66 IN TEXAS

"To Americans 100 years is a long time and
to Europeans 100 miles is a great distance." - Unk

Route 66 Texas Table of Contents:

  • Towns & Ghost Towns along Route 66
  • Route 66 Attractions - Museums, relics, markers & monuments
  • Route 66 Intro
  • Book Hotel Here › Amarillo Hotels | Shamrock Hotels
  • Popular:
    Resurrecting the Ghosts of Route 66 by Noel Kerns
  • Part I: From Oklahoma City to Shamrock, Texas
  • Part II: Shamrock to Amarillo, Texas
  • Part III: Amarillo, Texas to Endee, New Mexico

  • Texas US 66 road sign
    Route 66 sign
    A vintage photo taken on "The Mother Road"

    Courtesy TxDoT

    Route 66

    by John Troesser

    Before Mr. McAdam invented macadam, and long before reflective signs, passing lanes and exit signs; the railroad was the last word in transportation. The Panhandle got its first look at trains with the arrival of the Fort Worth and Denver in the 1880s. Then from 1902 -1909, the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad laid tracks East to West across the prairie; placing the roadbed and rails almost exactly atop nine county lines. (Armstrong, Wheeler, Gray, Donley, Carson, Randal, Potter, Oldham and Deaf Smith.)

    In the 30s, Route 66 more or less followed the rails. It became the evacuation route for displaced farmers during the Great Depression, but otherwise it remained under-used until the 1950s when the post-war boom forced it into full bloom. Then the U. S. Interstate system was built and soulless I-40 drained the lifeblood from the smaller towns and businesses on Route 66.

    Twenty-some years after being officially deactivated, interest in the highway continues to grow. It is, by far, the most celebrated highway in the world. Pilgrims are magnetically drawn to the seemingly endless ribbon of road, sky and prairie from all over the world. Peeling paint, weather-cracked driveways and chipped Formica viewed through streaked glass give visitors the feeling they're visiting a lost civilization and that's not too far from the truth in many cases. The road today can be thought of as a sort of open-air museum.

    Route 66 Texas

    Percentage-wise, Texas hosts a relatively short length of the road. From the Oklahoma line to the New Mexico line is a mere 178 miles, but surprisingly 90% of the original highway remains. Texas can also claim the Route 66 halfway point. Depending on one's philosophy on travel, entering the town of Adrian means your trip is either happily half-completed, or sadly half-over.

    Amarillo, may be the only Texas city mentioned in the famous song, but the smaller towns of Adrian, Alanreed, Lela and McLean are certainly doing their bit for preservation.


    John Troesser

    Sites Along Route 66 in Texas
    The fourteen towns found along Texas 66, their museums, ghost towns, relics, markers and monuments:
    From East to West:
    Book Hotel Here:
    Amarillo Hotels
    Shamrock Hotels
    More Texas Hotels
    New Mexico Hotels
    Oklahoma Hotels
  • Lela
  • Shamrock
  • McLean
  • Alanreed
  • Jericho
  • Groom
  • Lark
  • Conway
  • Amarillo
  • Bushland
  • Wildorado
  • Vega
  • Adrian
  • Glenrio
  • Erick, Oklahoma
  • Texas Route 66
    Texas Route 66
    Postcard courtesy www.rootsweb.com/ %7Etxpstcrd/

    Route 66 attractions
    Museums and Monuments:
  • Devil's Rope Barbed Wire Museum / Route 66 Museum, McLean
  • McLean P.O.W. Camp Historical Marker
  • The Route 66 Monument, Adrian
  • Resurrecting the Ghosts of Route 66 by Noel Kerns
  • Part I: From Oklahoma City to Shamrock, Texas
  • Part II: Shamrock to Amarillo, Texas
  • Part III: Amarillo, Texas to Endee, New Mexico
  • Cadillac Ranch by M.M. Harris
  • Tom Jones at Cadillac Ranch A photo essay
  • Bugg Ranch in Conway
    Photo Courtesy Barclay Gibson
  • Phillips 66 Service Station, McLean, Texas
    The First Phillips 66 Retail Outlet in Texas 1928
    Photo and Text Courtesy of Delbert Trew
  • Tower Conoco Station, Shamrock, Texas
    Photo Courtesy Terry Jeanson, et al
  • Marker mystery
  • Texola Route 66 Texas Marker Mystery
  • Texas Panhandle Mystery Monument


  • Book Hotel Here:
    Amarillo Hotels
    Shamrock Hotels
    More Texas Hotels
    New Mexico Hotels
    Oklahoma Hotels

    More Old Route 66
  • Querino Canyon Bridge, Houck Arizona
    Photos courtesy Barclay Gibson
  • Yucca, Arizona Ghost Town
    Photos courtesy Stephen Michaels
  • Kansas' Route 66 Bridge
    Photos by John Troesser

  • Delbert Trew of Alanreed is the man to talk to regarding Texas 66. His weekly column can be read in the Amarillo Globe and selected columns are available here in Texas Escapes He can often be found sharpening the exhibits at the Barbwire Museum.
    Texas Route 66 Forum
    Subject: Route 66 trip
    A friend of mine and I are planning a picture taking trip across the Texas panhandle on old Route 66. We are starting at Texola, OK and ending our trip in Genrio, Tx. You website has been very helpful and I've saved all the information. I have a question, however: are there any "don't do's" or "places to avoid" along the way? - Jerry Harris, October 10, 2005


    Related Topics:

    See Texas Panhandle
    Texas Towns | Texas Ghost Towns | Texas Counties

     


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