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Brazoria County TX
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QUINTANA, TEXAS

Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast

2855'29"N 9519'06"W
FM 1495 and 723
On the beach at the mouth of the Brazos
2 miles SE of Freeport
SW of Surfside Beach
S of Angleton the county seat
Population: 68 Est. 2016
56 (2010) 38 (2000) 51 (1990)

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Freeport Hotels
Quintana Texas
"Quintana Founded 1532"
Photo courtesy Ken Rudine, July 2007

History in a Seashell

Shortly after Mexico won her independence from Spain, they established a fort here at the mouth of the Brazos River. It is reportedly named after Mexican General Andres Quintana.

For a short time 1853-1857 Quintana had its own post office. They had another in 1891 and it lasted until 1915. Floods and hurricanes in 1900, 1913, and 1915 finally made them discontinue the postal service.

Quintana was a major port for Austin's Colony and a vacation spot for inland families to escape the summer heat.

Descriptions of the region by Mary Austin Holley note that they were entertained with native oysters and imported champagne, so life wasn't too bad for some folks in Quintana in the 1830s.

During the Civil War, the same strategic location recognized by the Mexicans prompted the Confederates to construct a fort and obstructions (a dam) to prevent Union ships from sailing up the Brazos, which was then navigable.

Numerous industries over the years failed due to economic problems and also because of damage inflicted by flooding and hurricanes.

A narrow wagon road built of red brick was uncovered after the 1913 flood and hidden two years later by another. The brick was reportedly not from Texas - and may have been ballast from arriving ships - discarded when cargo was taken on. Many buildings along coastal Texas were made of ballast brick - which was usually free for the taking.

In the early 1880s a family named Kanter had a contract to build jetties at Quintana. They were unable to finish the project and in 1889 a syndicate completed the job with granite shipped in from Central Texas.

The construction of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway also contributed to the decline of Quintana. The channel cut off shipping, which had been the economic base for both Quintana and Old Velasco.

Quintana for years has been a favorite destination for beach goers wanting to avoid Galveston crowds.
Quintana Beach Texas
Quintana Beach
Photo courtesy Ken Rudine, July 2007
Sargassum Seaweed sign, Quintana Texas
Photo courtesy Ken Rudine, July 2007
TX Brazoria County 1920s Map
Brazoria County 1920s map showing Quintana
From Texas state map #10749
Courtesy Texas General Land Office

Take a road trip

Quintana, Texas Nearby Towns:
Freeport
Angleton the county seat
West Columbia

See Brazoria County | Texas Gulf Coast

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Freeport Hotels | Angleton Hotel | More Hotels
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