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Harrison County TX
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SCOTTSVILLE, TEXAS

Harrison County, East Texas

Farm roads 1998 and 2199
5 miles E of Marshall the county seat
Population: 287

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Marshall Hotels
Scottsville Texas Cemetery and Chapel
A view of the Scottsville cemetery and chapel.
TE Photo October, 2001
Scottsville’s population was reported as 300 in 1929, as 50 during the Great Depression, and as around 260 by 1950 - which is just about where it stands today.

Scottsville still has its post office (granted in 1869) and ten businesses.

Scottsville is a dispersed community with no discernable center. The main attraction to the town is the cemetery.
Scottsville Texas 1936 marker
The bronze Scottsville marker from 1936
TE Photo

THE SCOTTSVILLE CEMETERY

Scottsville, Texas
and William Thomas Scott

The Scott family remembered their dead monumentally and the volume of artistic memorials makes one think that they may have kept a stonecutter/ sculptor on the payroll.

The Rose and Scott families joined each other in marriage prior to their arrival in Texas. The Yourees, Austins and Randolphs came later. The repetition of names in the cemetery would confuse all but the most knowledgeable genealogist or family member.
Scott name on Scott monument base , Scottsville Texas cemetery
The Scott names on the monument’s base
TE Photo
The town was named after William Thomas Scott, who moved to Texas from Louisiana in 1840. That year he built a plantation home, based on the plan of Jefferson Davis’ Biloxi, Mississippi home of Beauvoir. *(See Forum below.) Prior to the Civil War he was the largest slaveholder in Harrison County.

The Scotts also built a school and volunteered the services of the family governess to teach the local children.

During the Civil War the plantation provided provisions for Confederate troops.
Scott Confederate Monument
The Scott Confederate Monument
TE Photo
The cemetery displays a Confederate monument that is much larger than many found on courthouse lawns around the state. The Scotts involvement in the war is reflected in seven of the names inscribed on the pedestal. Many of the others were relatives.
Scottsville Cemetery Church plaque, Texas
Plaque from the church at Scottsville Cemetery c. 1904
TE Photo
The church at the cemetery was erected by the family of William Scott Youree after he was killed in Mexico in 1904. The weeping angel that marks his grave has become a popular regional photographic subject. It bears a striking resemblance to a memorial for a Hill family member in Houston’s Glenwood cemetery – even down to the missing hand.
Scottsville Texas - Scottsville Cemetery Weeping Angel
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, 2010
The angel at the grave of William Scott Youree
Youree monument inscription
The inscription on the Youree Monument
TE Photo
Najor Herman Kretz monument
“It happens in the best of families….”
TE Photo
On of the smallest stones in the Scottsville Cemetery is that of Major Herman Kretz – 2nd Battalion. Pennsylvania Infantry U.S. Army. A Yankee. It’s 18 inches of height would pales by comparison to the 50 foot tall Confederate monument. The fine print reads: Barried [sic] Lot 3593 Arlington National Cemetery. That probably makes everyone happy. The only reason it appears at all is that it is placed alongside his wife’s tombstone.

THE SCOTTSVILLE CEMETERY

Page 2 - William Thomas Scott
Page 3 - William Pinckney Rose

See also - Four Weeping Angels

The Scottsville Cemetery is one of the most picturesque in Texas and is worthy of a trip – even if it takes you out of your way. The histories of the families demonstrates the closeness and inter-dependence that existed between pioneer families in the early development of East Texas.

© John Troesser

Scottsville Texas Forum
  • I went to see the Weeping Angel at Youree Memorial Cemetery. Thanks for the information in TE. Sad to see the vandalism. - Barclay Gibson, May 05, 2006

  • Subject: Scottsville Cemetery
    I found your [magazine] and have enjoyed traveling around Texas in it. I did a Google search for Scottsville Cemetery and found your article. I am interested in finding out more history of this cemetery and the founding families. I am looking for early photo history. Could you put me in touch with anyone who might know about the Scottsville, Texas Cemetery and church? - Wilfred Smith Keithville, Louisiana, wilfredm@bowie-cass.com, May, 06, 2006


  • Subject: Scottsville, Texas
    Sirs, In the article (which was by the way very nice!) on the cemetery in Scottsville, the author mistakenly refers to Jefferson Davis's Biloxi home as "Bellerieve" . In truth, the name of his Biloxi home is "Beauvoir". I know because I just came back from Biloxi and took photos of its damage from Katrina. Attached is a photo with the correct spelling. It's a small thing, spelling, but history buffs will notice! - Kathy L. Baumgarten, March 09, 2006

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    Scottsville, Texas Nearby Towns:
    Marshall the county seat
    Jefferson
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