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SLIDE, TEXAS

Lubbock County, Texas Panhandle

CR 1740 and CR 1900 (Slide Road)
13 Miles SW of Lubbock
13.5 Miles E of Ropesville
Population: 0044 (2000)

Slide, Texas Area Hotels > Lubbock Hotels

History in a Pecan Shell

In the 1890s, the community was first known by the surveyor’s impersonal and dull designation of “Block Twenty.” Nevertheless, settlers arrived to populate the land and things were on track.

In 1903 the land was resurveyed by W. R. Standefer (see forum below) who had a two-mile disagreement with the former surveyor. To make things right with the banks and the land people, the residents were inconvenienced by a “slide” to their rightful plots.

The people were easy to move but buildings were not. Proud of their accomplishment, the townsfolk weren’t going to let their labors be forgotten. The relocated town would henceforth be known as Slide, Texas.

Slide is second only to Lubbock as the county’s oldest community. Lumber for the town’s homes and school came all the way from Colorado City a distance of 120 miles on today's highways.

The town had a post office from 1904 to 1915 and again from 1917 to 1929. In 1942 the population was unofficially noted at ten. There were two businesses in 1961–62, when the population was forty. In 1970–71 the population was the same, but the community had lost its businesses. From the late 1980s through 2000 Slide had forty-four residents and no businesses.
Slide TX 1929 Postmark info
Slide TX 1929 Postmark
Postcard cancelled with 1929 Slide postmark
Courtesy The John J. Germann Collection

Poem by David Knape:

SLIDE, TEXAS

When asked to describe
how the town of Slide
got its funny name
folks quickly replied

The surveyor screwed up and
when we discovered the lie
we all just slid over
and became known as Slide.


~d.knape

*First settled in the 1890's, the area was resurveyed in 1903 by W.R. Standefer and determined that most settlers were two miles off their proper sites. Residents "slid" over to their right sections. Buildings were moved west, and the event was commemorated in the name, Slide!

Slide, Texas Forum

Subject: Slide Texas
I wanted to make a comment in response to Roxanne Standefer’s comment on Slide. I am a surveyor in Lubbock, near Slide. I have surveyed properties at or very near Slide. I have followed W.R. Standefer, her Great Grandfather before. In fact I did a survey last month that involved some of his Field Notes.

What I am curious about is another Surveyor named Standefer.(and I have wondered about this a long time). In the early 70’s I worked for the City of Dallas Water Department. There was a surveyor there that was known as “Old Man Standefer”. I never heard him referred to in any other way. We were in Dallas but he had surveyed in West Texas and had stories about finding stones and bottles or piles of broken glass for monuments. Even being known as Old Man Standefer I think he would have been too young to have been W.R. Standefer but I wondered if he may have been related, maybe a son or nephew. I wonder if Roxanne knows if there were younger Standefers that may have moved to Dallas and surveyed there? I know that is slim but I have always wondered. - Jon Cieszinski, Ransom Canyon, Texas, January 06, 2015


Subject: Slide, Texas

I enjoyed reading about why Slide TX is so named. You refer to a W.R. Standefer Lubbock county surveyor who had a 2 Mile disagreement with the previous survey and as a result the town moved their homes 2 miles West. What a story. What makes it better? That surveyor was my Great Grandfather. His son Leslie Earl was a cowboy who married my Grandmother in Alberta. Their son Raymond was my father. I want to do more with this story and will be investigating further but just wanted you to know how I got started and when I have more will try to post for you. Thank you very much. - Roxanne Standefer, Ottawa Canada, March 03, 2013


Texas Escapes, in its purpose to preserve historic, endangered and vanishing Texas, asks that anyone wishing to share their local history and vintage/historic photos, please contact us.
Lubbock & Crosby County Texas 1907 Postal map
1907 Lubbock County postal map showing Slide (SW of Lubbock)
Courtesy Texas General Land Office
Slide, Texas Area Destinations:
See Lubbock County | Lubbock
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