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 Texas : Towns A-Z / Gulf Coast :

HOCKLEY, TEXAS

Harris County, Texas Gulf Coast
Highways 6, and (old) 290
36 Miles NW of Houston

13 Miles SE of Hempstead
Population: 300 (2000)

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Hockley Texas road
Hockley's road less traveled
TE photo, 2007
History in a Pecan Shell

Sam McCurley is credited with being the first settler here – some seven years before the Texas Revolution. Not much is known about Mr. McCurley, since it was George Washington Hockley (see below) who established the town just prior to hostilities. The Texas Army camped here in April of 1836.

The railroad (the Houston and Texas Central) arrived in the Spring of 1857 and the following year a post office was opened under the name of Houseville. This oversight was soon corrected and the name changed to the founder, who had died just four years previously. After the Civil War it was suggested that Hockley become the county seat of a county with the same name, but the idea didn’t have enough support.

BY 1890 the population was nearly 300. Six years later the town was thriving with a cooton gin, three stores and four saloons. In the 1920s the population decreased to around 200 – remaining there through the 1940s. After WWII the population rose to 300 – remaining there through the 2000 Census.

Although the Handbook of Texas lists 95 businesses in Hockley, a visit to the densely-shaded community will show little evidence of such an economy.
Hockley: The Man

George Washington Hockley, was born in Philadelphia in 1802. As a War Department clerk in Washington D.C. he met (the future) Governor of Tennessee Sam Houston who suggested that he relocate there. Hockley and Houston became friends and when Houston came to Texas in 1835, he made Hockley his chief of staff when he became commander-in-chief. Hockley was in charge of the lengendary “Twin Sisters” at the battle of San Jacinto.

Houston appointed Hockley to several other posts, including secretary of war (prior to statehood). Hockley also traveled to Mexico as an emissary of peace in 1843. Hockley did not live in his namesake town, but chose Galveston. On a trip to visit Henry L. Kinney in Corpus Christi, in June of 1854, Hockley died and was buried in Old Bayview cemetery. The Texas Centennial Commission Committee erected a marker at his gravesite in 1936.
Hockley Texas Cowboy Silhuette
TE photo, 2007
See Cowboy Silhouette
Hockley Texas Quonset Hut
Quonset Hut
TE photo, 2007
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